Complying with the Equality Act 2010

Publishing information

Employment information

The equality duty requires public bodies to consider how best to publish information along the following lines:

  • the make-up of the overall workforce
  • the gender pay gap and pay equality issues more generally for the public body
  • recruitment and retention rates for staff with different protected characteristics
  • applications for flexible working and their outcomes for different protected characteristics
  • applications for learning and development opportunities and their outcomes for staff with different protected characteristics
  • grievances and disciplinary issues for staff with different protected characteristics

Published information could also include details of policies and programmes that have been put in place to address equality concerns within the workforce, and information from staff surveys.

Policies and services

The equality duty requires public bodies to consider how the decisions that they make, and the services they deliver, affect people who share different protected characteristics. The specific duties require public bodies to publish information to show they did this. This could include information they considered relating to:

  • the number of people with different protected characteristics who access and use services in different ways
  • customer satisfaction levels and informal feedback from service users with different protected characteristics and results of consultations
  • complaints about discrimination and complaints from people with different protected characteristics
  • service outcomes for people with different protected characteristics

Published information could also include details of policies and programmes that have been put in place to address equality concerns in service delivery.

Setting and publishing equality objectives

We will decide what equality objectives we set and how many there should be. We will take into account evidence of equality issues across all of our functions, consider issues affecting people sharing each of the protected characteristics and think about each of the three aims of the equality duty.

In setting our objectives, we will think about:

  • what evidence we will use to inform the objectives, from both internal and external sources
  • what types of equality issues are raised by our staff and customers
  • where the evidence indicates that equality performance is poor
  • what objectives could be set to stretch the organisation to perform better on equality issues in key areas
  • whether there is scope to benchmark equality information and objectives against similar public bodies
  • the people and organisations it would be useful to talk to in the process of setting objectives
  • whether to set short term, medium term or long term objectives in different areas
  • how progress against the objectives will be measured